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Infectious Disease Prevention

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E.Coli
Food
Interaction With the Environment
Human Animal Interaction
Personal Behavior
Animal Infectious Disease
Hygiene Hypothesis
Links
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E.Coli

According to the Center for Disease Control, most E.Coli are harmless and actually essential. The human digestive system is largely dependant on E.Coli. E.Coli is not the problem; the excessive use of antibiotics is the real problem.


CDC - most E.Coli are harmless
E. coli probiotic
ASM - origin of antibiotic resistance
Antibiotic resistance

Virus phage affected by antibiotics makes E.Coli extremely deadly.


Nature - antibiotics cause Phage on the Rage
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Food

Insure adequate mineral intake, nutrition, and living food. This will stimulate the immune system to peak efficiency.

Practice food sanitation and proper storage to prevent Botulism, parasites, Salmonella, etc. Cook all meat to an internal temperature of 180 F.

Practice water sanitation to prevent contamination with Campylobacter, Cholera, parasites, Typhoid Fever, etc. Boil water for 5-10 minutes or treat chemically with chlorine.

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Interaction With the Environment

Get vaccinations as recommended by your local physician. Especially important is Tetanus. Annual shots for the elderly against influenzae may also be advised.

Avoid underbrush and dense grass to prevent Lyme Disease, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, and Tularemia from ticks and Scabies from mites. Cats or dogs that roam in the wild can bring disease carrying fleas and ticks back to you. Fleas transmit Typhus. Ticks can transmit Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Lyme Disease, Tularemia, etc. Wild game contact should be limited and controlled to avoid Tularemia, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Lyme Disease, etc.

Always wear protective clothing, shoes, and gloves when working outdoors and remove anything soiled just before entering indoors. Avoid skin breaks against rusted or soiled objects. This will help prevent infection from Tetenus, Ringworm, Sporotrichosis, parasites from fly bites, Tularemia from fly bites, etc. Wear protective clothing and masks when cleaning animal shelter sites, feeding animals, and slaughtering animals. This will help protect you from Campylobacter, Psittacosis, Shigellosis, Swine Flu, Histoplasmosis, Cryptococcosis, parasites, etc. Use mask and gloves when handling sick or dead animals to avoid diseases such as Anthrax.

Do not swim in or come into contact with water that is stagnant or potentially contaminated. Such water can contain infectious bacteria such as Campylobacter, Giardiasis, Leptospirosis, etc.

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Human Animal Interaction

Keep raw manure as far as reasonably possible away from the raw food garden. Raw food may need to be treated with a water chlorine solution.

Avoid direct contact with animal manure. Do not use fresh manure within 120 days of raw harvest if the crop is in direct contact with the soil. Do not use fresh manure within 90 days of raw harvest if the crop is not in direct contact with the soil. This will help protect against listeriosis, parasites, etc.

Never use pig, dog, or cat manure in the garden where foods that are eatin raw come into contact with the soil. Cat manure can contain Toxoplasmosis. Pig manure can contain Liver Flukes, Trichinosis, Taeniasis, Yersinia, etc. .

Do not breath animal dander, manure compost dust, mulch dust, and soil dust to avoid exposure to fungus, Tularemia, Histoplasmosis, etc. Avoid direct contact with animals.


Livestock human health connection

Rodent proof your house. Inspect regularly for droppings. This will help prevent transmission of the Plague virus.

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Personal Behavior

Wash hands after using the restroom to prevent transmission of Campylobacter, Cholera, parasites, Shigellosis, hepatitis, etc. Wash hands before preparing food and eating. Avoid touching food as much as possible during preparation. Keep hands away from face.

Sleep, cook, and eat with screens on any open windows and doors. Avoid working or sleeping outdoors at night without protection to prevent mosquito and kissing bug bites. This will help prevent West Nile Virus, Dengue, Malaria, Encephalitis, Encephalomyelitis, Chagas, etc.

Practice person to person contact controls. Immediately isolate anyone who is sick and cover all coughing and sneezing.

Use strict control of clothing, bedding, and regular hygiene to prevent lice and pin Worms. Lice and pin Worms are spread by person to person contact or by contact with bed linens, clothing, or carpeting. Do not allow animals in the house.

Insure fresh air circulation in the home.

Do not keep toothbrush or other personal items in the bathroom. Waste flushing aerosolization occurs up to 9 feet away. Daily oral hygiene is essential to prevent bacterial blood infection.

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Animal Infectious Disease

Work with a veterinarian who is committed to an organic disease prevention program. Preferably someone who focuses on natural preventive measures rather than medicines and chemicals.

Insure adequate mineral intake by all animals. This will stimulate their immune system to peak efficiency.

Do not allow domestic animals into standing water. Standing water is a breeding site for snails which can harbor liver flukes of pig, cattle, sheep, and humans.

Grow herbs for animals to self medicate. Woody perrenials will also pull minerals from deep in the soil.

Rest pasture long enough for parasite numbers to die back.

Control rodents with owls and rodent proof storage.

Limit all human farm traffic which can bring in disease such as Hoof and Mouth. Provide a quarantine area for new animals. Insure all new animals have been inspected for Brucellosis, etc.

Shelter animals and pets at night to prevent exposure to mosquitoes and kissing bugs. Or eliminate mosquito breeding sites such as standing water or ponds. Eliminate kissing bug sites such as dense cover.

Protect all domestic poultry and pigs from contact with wild birds to prevent transmission of Avian Influenza Virus. Water bodies and grain fields are especially attractive to wild birds. Protect domestic bird and pig feeding and housing areas from invasion by wild birds. Avoid breathing, eye contact, or touching dust or droppings from birds and pigs.

Avoid direct contact with bats, coyotes, foxes, and skunks as they can be carriers of rabbies. Keep pets from contact with these animals.

Keep soil PH neutral to prevent endemic soil bacteria at low levels. Acid soil can encourage infectious soil bacteria.

Keeping animal populations at moderate levels and in free range conditions has always been considered one of the best ways to prevent disease.

Connection between organophosphate use and mad cow disease:


Mark Purdey
Journal of Animal Science
University of Minnesota
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Hygiene Hypothesis

It is difficult to know just how much cleanliness to practice. There is some evidence that the "Hygiene Hypothesis" may be true.

Hygiene Hypothesis
Good example of the Hygiene Hypothesis
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Links

AHVMA

American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association


Will Winter DVM

Co-founder of the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association.


State of Texas - Infectious Disease List

List of infectious diseases and their mode of transmission.


CDC Disease List

List of diseases and their cause.


ATTRA - Manure Guidelines

Guidelines for the safe use of manure.


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